Saturday, October 3, 2015

A Designing Woman 6 for #wewriwar

More from the Steampunk book



Welcome to Weekend Writing Warriors.  This is a sample from my latest work in progress, "A Designing Woman", and I hope you enjoy it.  This is the start of the next chapter and introduces more of the family. Continuing from last week, this snippet describes conversations between Amanda's parents. Dark things are afoot, especially now that they understand her hobby, which they have tolerated, could be worth real money.
(The Last snippet)







That's true; Do you think she'd like to visit Bath?”

Only to see the ironworks.”

That's not helpful.”

While she was away, I could do something about her workshop, maybe. She's not twenty-one is she?”

No,” Lady Caterham smiled, “So as her father you're her legal guardian; your word is the one that counts, isn't it?”

Get her to Bath, and I'll deal with the rest; have to check with my solicitor, but I should be able to sell out her share of that company. It should pay for her dowry.”

Lady Caterham replied, “George, love, I knew there was a reason I married you.”

Her husband, realizing he was dismissed for the night, dutifully kissed his wife and returned to his port.




This is a work in progress. Here is the link on tablo. It's also on writeon, but I have no clue how to link there. Apparently Steampunk implies Victorian, Dieselpunk the 1920's. What-punk should a Regency period book be? Horse-punk isn't right.

Despite being told in no uncertain terms that "steampunk" meant Victorian with ubiquitous steam technology, I'm calling this steampunk, although given the amount of time they will later spend on the river, maybe "Steampunt" is better. Amanda is working on what will become the defining technology of the 19th century, steam. Although, a few things, like the Napoleonic war will get in the way.

Google Blogger has gone back to making things difficult. Arghhh - doesn't play well with firefox and privacy badger.

Time to look at wordpress. It's being funny on Linux which takes some doing.

Thank you for reading. The heroine's family thinks they're doing the right thing by her. Ha! She doesn't get to the Bath ironworks, but if it's any consolation, she gets to do a small amount of smithing in the village of Philadelphia so that she isn't compromised by staying the night with a totally unsuitable suitor.